LORDS OF THE CAPITAL,
WHY NOT REMAIN HERE
AND LENGTHEN
YOUR DAYS?

0047, Oslo

On view:

February 17 - March 25, 2012
By appointment March 25-March 31, 2012

Layout of the exhibition completed in consultation with
Oslo based Feng Shui experts Gabriella Chow and Christina Aas.

Opening Ikebana performance by B. Lennart Persson.



lords of the capital

Do Not Build Any Homes Below This Point. 2012.
After the Japanese tsunami disaster, residents noticed ancient
stone monuments in the hillsides along the coast carved with
simple, unheeded warnings of impending tidal waves.
Sandblasted «coral sea» granite and sheet of Marmoleum™
linoleum. 


lords of the capital



lords of the capital

RGB. 2012. Linen fragments from 500BC. Risograph print on paper, framed.


lords of the capital

RGB. 2012. Linen fragments from 500BC. Risograph print on paper, framed.


lords of the capital

RGB. 2012. Linen fragments from 500BC. Risograph print on paper, framed.


lords of the capital 

Ikebana by B. Lennart Persson (Sogetsu school). 2012.
Ikebana and mid-century Modern ceramic vase by Erik Pløen.

 

Lords of the Capital

Contagion. 2012. Belgian linen, patch cables, ocean sound and
Ikebana by B. Lennart Persson with mid-century free style Japanese ceramic vase.


Lords of the Capital

Ikebana by B. Lennart Persson (Sogetsu school). 2002.
Ikebana with mid-century free style Japanese ceramic vase.


lords of the capital

Contagion. 2012.



lords of capital

Contagion. 2012.



LORDS OF THE CAPITAL





lords of the capital

Contagion. 2012. Belgian linen and patch cables.



lords of the capital

Good Job! 2012. Public domain NASA deep field photo
laser etched onto aluminum and framed as honorary plaque.


lords of the capital

Ikebana by B. Lennart Persson (Sogetsu school). 2012.
Ikebana and mid-century Modern ceramic vases by Rörstrand atelje.


lords of the capital

Personal. 2012.
HD laser etched with image of decayed data, containing 2 TB of personal files.



lords of the capital



lords of the capital



lords of the capital

4EAE. 2011. Tombstone Patents etched onto granite kitchen tiles.


lords of the capital

4EAE. 2011. Tombstone Patents etched onto granite kitchen tiles.


lords of the capital

Lords of the Capital. 2011.
Tang dynasty Chinese poems engraved onto fine bone china ceramic plates.


lords of the capital

Lords of the Capital. 2011.
Tang dynasty Chinese poems engraved onto fine bone china ceramic plates.



Lords of the Capital



Lords of the Capital



lords of the capital



Lords of the Capital

Secret Blend & Share. 2012.


lords of the capital

Secret Blend. 2012.
Watercolor on paper and error printed $5 bill purchased online for $100, framed.


lords of the capital

Secret Blend. 2012.
Watercolor on paper and error printed $5 bill purchased online for $100, framed.


lords of the capital

Share. 2012.
One share of Walt Disney Corporation stock purchased in the name
Res Publica. Stock certificate and watercolor on paper, framed.


lords of the capital

Share. 2012. One share of Walt Disney Corporation stock purchased in the name
Res Publica. Stock certificate and watercolor on paper, framed.

 

Lords of the Capital

Good Job! 2012. Public domain NASA deep field photo
laser etched onto aluminum and framed as honorary plaques.


lords of the capital



lords of the capital

Lifestyle Traveling. 2011
Screenshots of altered Wikipedia pages laser etched onto archival paper, framed.


lords of the capital

Feng Shui Solution Number 2: Inlaid labour. 2012. Found bamboo board.


lords of the capital



Lords of the capital

Security Detail. 2012.
Hi res scans of paper money from USA laser etched onto archival paper, framed.


Lords of the capital

Security Detail. 2012.
Hi res scans of paper money from China laser etched onto archival paper, framed.


Lords of the capital

Security Detail. 2012.
Hi res scans of paper money from Russia laser etched onto archival paper, framed.

 

Lords of the Capital

Sonny-Bono Act. 2012. Linen and plaque



lords of the capital

Opening Ikebana performance by B. Lennart Persson


lords of the capital

Opening Ikebana performance by B. Lennart Persson


lords of the capital

Opening Ikebana performance by B. Lennart Persson


lords of the capital

Opening Ikebana performance by B. Lennart Persson


 

Money was developed as a convenient and sophisticated storage device. Power created by owning a stockpile of perishable commodities such as grain could be preserved through time after it was converted into money. Since one person or family could not directly consume the concentrated abundance that occurs during times of aristocratic dominance, the value of perishable resources could be stored in abstraction and used strategically (by buying more land for example) to maintain dominance in the future. Paper money such as a $10 note is a leftover physical symbol of the schism of abstract value: in advanced societies, cash is being replaced by electronic transactions, and abstraction has increased exponentially in finance capital. Financial markets elegantly detach themselves from physicality, hovering above in storm fronts. Abstraction seems to be a human ideal: this powerful ability of the human mind allows us to reach higher concepts and higher levels of existence, but it so often leads us to dehumanization and subsequent brutality.

The current battle of copyright law is an attempt to consolidate, stock pile and store the value of ideas as though they were piles of grain. Aristocratic media firms aggressively claim ownership of abstractions and attack the public with legal action. Their strategy is to co-opt historical ideas from flourishing contexts and then strike to shut down current productivity where the same ideas may continue to thrive into the future. NASA, one of the few remaining US agencies with at least a partially constructive mission, has been uploading public domain hi def deep space photos taken by the Hubble telescope. That is nice.

Storage media in human history include both biological and inanimate objects. Tradition is a powerful biological method of idea transmission. From oral history to daily ritual, old ideas adapt to new contexts and the ideas are altered, often radically, while still maintaining some essence. Examples of physical inanimate storage media include grave markers, ceramics, linen, buildings, printed matter, and recently, the unstable hard drive. One difference between the biological and the inanimate archive is that objects that have survived long periods of time are orphans, stripped of their relevant contexts. Therefore we often appreciate old objects primarily for their formal novelty, or just for the fact that they are old. The biological archive, traditions, rituals and human practices, on the other hand, exists precisely because we have adapted old ideas into current contexts. The use of linen for example: linen was used to wrap mummies in ancient Egypt and it is now used as a fine, durable surface to make art paintings.  Linen was also used as currency in ancient Egypt and today the US paper money still contains 25% linen. The technology is almost the same, but its uses have shifted.

The craze to digitize books, photos and other works on paper is simultaneously an urge for convenience and preservation: but since the average server lasts 5 years before it needs an upgrade or a replacement, the paper source, if stored correctly, will last much longer than the digital copy. Digital files must be continually replaced using new equipment. This constant upkeep assumes a budget, but economic will is fickle: see Detroit.

All of the works in this show approach these issues one way or another. We produced many of the objects by sending orders through the internet to remote companies who produce or handle customizable niche objects such as etched granite, engraved ceramics, anodized metal, honorary plaques, sandblasted monuments etc. for domestic or small business use. We worked with several small businesses based in the United States, some of the last manufacturing that remains there. Sun Ra said he sent broadcast transmissions of his music into outer space so aliens would recognize there was some intelligent life on earth.  He also thought a lot about possible futures.

Aeron Bergman and Alejandra Salinas
Oslo, January 2012